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A late 19th-​century view of the Warner House from the cor­ner of Daniel and Chapel streets.
Fur­nish­ings seen in this 1915-​Wallace Nut­ting pho­to­graph are in the Warner House today as many fam­ily pos­ses­sions returned in the inter­ven­ing years since the house became a museum in 1932.
The “Recep­tion Room” enter­tained guests and was the site of two fam­ily wed­dings in the 1820s.
Por­trait artist Joseph Black­burn cap­tured the like­ness of the extended Warner fam­ily in 1761. Polly Warner (cen­ter) was the only child of Jonathan Warner, son-​in-​law of first owner Capt. Archibald Macpheadris..
Shortly after con­struc­tion, Capt. Archibald Macp­head­ris com­mis­sioned work on the murals. The four murals are con­sid­ered the old­est extant wall murals in the country.
Dis­cover Portsmouth-​made fur­ni­ture includ­ing the Robert Harold book­case (pic­tured left) built for that cor­ner of Jonathan Warner’s study. Its cen­ter shelves con­tain Polly Warner’s per­sonal library, a unique col­lec­tion of books sent from Lon­don in 1765 to edu­cate a proper young lady.
The Warner House is a short walk from the North Church and Mar­ket Square, the hub of his­toric down­town Portsmouth.
Learn more about the con­nec­tion between the Warner House and the Memo­r­ial Bridge.

Memo­r­ial Bridge Opening

The advent of auto­mo­biles and the Memo­r­ial Bridge almost resulted in the demo­li­tion of the Warner House in the early 1930s. The John S. Sher­burne House (far right) was already razed for a gas sta­tion, and another gas sta­tion was planned for the site before a group of early preser­va­tion­ists pur­chased the house and turned it into a museum. The Warner House truly is a remark­able survivor.
Through­out the sea­son, the Warner House hosts numer­ous pro­grams and events.

Cal­en­dar of Events

Step back in time! The Warner House offers walk-​in, guided tours explor­ing dif­fer­ent peri­ods of fam­ily occu­pancy room by room.
“Any­one who stops learn­ing is old, whether at twenty or eighty.” –Henry Ford

LAT­EST NEWS

Warner House Receives LCHIP GrantLand & Community Heritage Investment Program

Recently, the New Hamp­shire Land and Com­mu­nity Her­itage Invest­ment Pro­gram (LCHIP) awarded the Warner House a $47,000 match­ing grant. LCHIP is an inde­pen­dent state author­ity that pro­motes preser­va­tion of nat­ural, cul­tural and his­toric resources by pro­vid­ing match­ing grants to non-​profits and munic­i­pal­i­ties. For more infor­ma­tion on LCHIP, visit www​.lchip​.org

Warner House will use the funds for exte­rior enve­lope and struc­tural repairs related to mois­ture mit­i­ga­tion. The project will include much needed repairs to the brick piers in the base­ment and repairs of other ele­ments includ­ing the fol­low­ing: para­pet caps, win­dows, masonry and gut­ters. All work will adhere to the Sec­re­tary of the Interior’s Stan­dards for the Treat­ment of His­toric Prop­er­ties, ensur­ing that as much his­toric fab­ric is retained as pos­si­ble, that if an archi­tec­tural ele­ment has dete­ri­o­rated beyond repair, it is replaced in-​kind and through mak­ing mod­i­fi­ca­tions reversible.

Work will occur over a two-​year period and be com­pleted in time to cel­e­brate our 300th anniver­sary and will posi­tion the Warner House to last another 300 years. Be on the look­out for spe­cial­ized “hard hat tours” and spe­cial pro­grams high­light­ing our progress.

To donate to this wor­thy cause and assist us in rais­ing funds to match our chal­lenge grant, please click on the donate but­ton, which will take you to the secure Pay­pal site. If you would pre­fer to pay by check, please make the check payable to the WARNER HOUSE ASSO­CI­A­TION, memo line LCHIP GRANT, and mail it to WARNER HOUSE ASSO­CI­A­TION, P.O. BOX 895, PORTSMOUTH, NH 038020895.